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applicant Photo

Application Status: Approved
Visa Status: In Progress

Teacher Details:


Name: Savvas
Teacher ID: 13614
Nationality: British
Have you lived or worked overseas before?: Yes

Placement Preferences


Available Date: 1st October 2023
Travel Plans: I am travelling alone
Location Preferences: No preference

Education


Highest Qualification: MA
Degree Subject: International Relations
University / Institution: MA at New York University, BA at University of York
Grade: BA: 2.1, MA: 3.8/4.0
Do you have a TEFL certificate: Yes
Details of TEFL certificate:

CELTA

Were you educated in your native country?: No
Education comments:

Work Experience

Position


Job title: Mathematics Tutor
Employer: University of York
Date of employment: October 2018-December 2019
Summary of role:

-Tutored small groups of first-year students who had not studied Mathematics at A-Level to help them catch up with the university course. Sessions lasted two hours a week.
-Compiled and presented a revision lecture during the final week of term to refresh students’ knowledge of the entire module. The tutoring and revision session significantly improved the students’ grades in the January exam.

Position


Job title: Internship
Employer: Green Εconomics Institute
Date of employment: September 2020-October 2020
Summary of role:

-Created and presented the PowerPoint presentation for the Climate Networking Conference run with the support of the Green European Foundation and attended by 200 people including policy makers, academics, campaigners, writers and scientists.
-Produced reports on the Climate Networking Conference speakers, including speakers from Greenpeace, Climate Action Network Europe, and MEPs. These were subsequently published in the post-conference journal.
-Edited ‘Landfill in Latvia. Towards a Circular Economy. A Scientific Monograph’, a book published by the Green Economics Institute.

Position


Job title: Internship
Employer: Embassy of the Republic of Cyprus in Beijing
Date of employment: July 2019- September 2019
Summary of role:

-Produced detailed reports on political affairs in East Asia, including the pro-democracy Hong Kong protests, that were sent to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Cyprus.
-Composed diplomatic correspondence letters (including note verbale) to various government representations, such as embassies and ministries of foreign affairs.
-Produced statistical reports measuring the frequency of different types of visas applied for, identifying the most popular application centers and the most popular months for applications.
-Updated information on the embassy website regarding bilateral meetings with China, volume of trade, and the number of visitors from each country to the other country.
-Assisted with embassy filing system and organizing visa records.

Position


Job title: Corporal
Employer: Cyprus National Guard
Date of employment: June 2016-September 2017
Summary of role:

-Acted as the line of communication between soldiers and the captain, and was responsible for the safety and readiness of my squad.
-Took part in weapons training (including assembling and disassembling), guard duty, weekly military emergency drills, and monthly target practice at live-fire shooting range.

Supporting Information:

Why do you want to teach overseas?:

My parents have been powerful role models; their influence has shaped my interests and values. My parents were EFL teachers in their youth, and their love of language learning and education has given me valuable insights into the challenges and rewards of teaching EFL. Seeing the fulfillment they derived from teaching has inspired me to pursue a similar career path. My mother’s studies in linguistics provided her with a deeper understanding of how language works. Her passion for the scientific study of language inspired me to explore the structure, sounds, and meanings of language, helpful skills for teaching students to learn and understand English and develop their language skills. I want to teach EFL (English as a Foreign Language) to share my enthusiasm for linguistics with my students. I look forward to designing and delivering lessons that help my students improve their grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, and their ability to communicate effectively in English, through speaking, writing, or listening. I find great fulfillment in seeing my students progress and succeed in their language-learning journey. The ability to speak and understand English is becoming increasingly important in today’s globalized world. Proficiency in English provides international career opportunities in a wide range of fields, such as business, science, and technology. I am excited to impart to my students the skills and confidence they need to succeed in their personal and professional lives. I want to teach in Korea specifically because K-dramas have piqued my interest in immersing myself in Korean culture and experiencing it firsthand. K-dramas have afforded me an understanding and appreciation for Korean culture, including traditional customs, social norms, and everyday life in South Korea. Living and teaching in Korea would allow me to immerse myself in the Korean language and gain a deeper understanding of the culture. Teaching EFL in Korea would combine my passion for language learning and teaching with my interest in Korean culture, making it a truly fulfilling and enriching experience.

Why are you a suitable candidate for teaching overseas?:

Encountering cultural differences can be both a challenging and enriching aspect of teaching overseas. On one hand, it can be difficult to navigate unfamiliar customs and traditions, and it can take time and effort to adapt to a new culture. On the other hand, encountering cultural differences can also be a wonderful opportunity to learn and grow, and it can broaden our perspective and understanding of the world. Adapting to any new country and culture can be challenging, however, some differences may make it easier or more difficult to adapt to different types of environments. New York’s cosmopolitanism makes foreigners stand out less and offers opportunities to interact with people from different cultures, which makes it easier to adapt. In contrast, Korea is a monocultural, homogenous country with fewer opportunities to interact with people from different cultural backgrounds, which can make it more challenging to adapt to the local culture and customs. Korea will be more difficult to communicate and get by without speaking Korean, another problem I did not have in New York. During my internship in Beijing, I developed skills that will help me adapt to Korean school life and culture. In particular, my experience in Beijing taught me the importance of being open-minded and respectful of other cultures, and of taking the time to learn and understand cultural differences rather than judging or imposing my cultural norms. My studies in International Relations at NYU have also given me a deeper understanding of the complexities and nuances of cultural differences. Through my coursework, I have learned about the various factors that shape cultural norms and practices, and I have gained a greater appreciation for the diversity of cultures around the world. As I adapt to Korean school life and culture, I plan to approach it with an open mind and a willingness to learn. Humor can be a universal language that helps to break down barriers and build connections between people from different cultures. Political and social issues may be seen differently from one culture to another, but can also provide common ground for discussion and understanding. However cultural differences still play a significant role in how humor and politics are perceived and received. What may be funny or acceptable in one culture may not be in another, and it is important to be aware of and respect these differences. Similarly, political and social issues can be sensitive and controversial, and it is important to approach them with respect and sensitivity to avoid causing offense or causing tension. I will seek out opportunities to learn about Korean customs and traditions, and I will strive to be respectful and understanding of cultural differences. This approach will help me adapt more smoothly to my new environment allowing me to have a more meaningful and enriching experience living and working in Korea.

Additional information:

My teaching philosophy centers on the belief that all students have the potential to succeed and that my role as a teacher is to help them reach their full potential through a combination of high expectations, personalized instruction, and a supportive and inclusive learning environment. The CELTA qualification taught me a student-centered teaching approach through interactive peer learning activities that foster critical thinking and problem-solving skills. However, it is common for Korean public schools to follow a traditional, teacher-centered approach to education where teachers lecture and students listen and take notes, with a focus on memorization and rote learning. That being said, I understand that every school and teacher is different, and there are variations in teaching approaches and philosophies within Korean public schools. I will strive to understand and respect the local educational system and culture, while also bringing my teaching philosophy and style to the classroom. As part of the CELTA course, I had to mark both written assignments and record speaking to assess the kinds of mistakes students made. This has given me practice in identifying which language skills (grammar, vocabulary, speaking, and listening) students are strong or weak at so that I can address their difficulties. I am interested in the difficulties Korean-speaking students face when learning English due to the significant differences between the two languages. Korean has a subject-object-verb sentence structure, while English follows a subject-verb-object order, which can lead to confusion and difficulties in understanding and producing correct sentences in English. In addition, English and Korean have no cognates thus Korean-speaking students cannot rely on their knowledge of Korean vocabulary to understand English words. Korean-speaking students may also face challenges with pronunciation, as English has many sounds that do not exist in Korean. For example, Korean does not have a “th” sound, so producing this sound can be difficult for Korean-speaking students. I will consider such challenges when designing lessons and giving feedback to my Korean-speaking students. I plan to draw on my experience as a mathematics tutor to bring a structured and organized approach to my lessons. My experience in the Cyprus National Guard has also taught me the importance of discipline and the value of clear communication, skills that are crucial for effective teaching. I plan to take advantage of professional development opportunities, such as workshops and training programs, to stay up-to-date on best practices in EFL teaching. I will conduct ongoing reflections on my teaching methods and seek out mentors and colleagues who can offer guidance and support as I continue to grow as a teacher. Overall, I am committed to continuously learning and improving as a teacher, in order to provide the best possible education for my students.

Back to results

applicant Photo

Application Status: Approved
Visa Status: In Progress

Teacher Details:


Name: Savvas
Teacher ID: 13614
Nationality: British
Have you lived or worked overseas before?: Yes

Placement Preferences


Available Date: 1st October 2023
Travel Plans: I am travelling alone
Location Preferences: No preference

Education


Highest Qualification: MA
Degree Subject: International Relations
University / Institution: MA at New York University, BA at University of York
Grade: BA: 2.1, MA: 3.8/4.0
Do you have a TEFL certificate: Yes
Details of TEFL certificate:

CELTA

Were you educated in your native country?: No
Education comments:

Work Experience

Position


Job title: Mathematics Tutor
Employer: University of York
Date of employment: October 2018-December 2019
Summary of role:

-Tutored small groups of first-year students who had not studied Mathematics at A-Level to help them catch up with the university course. Sessions lasted two hours a week.
-Compiled and presented a revision lecture during the final week of term to refresh students’ knowledge of the entire module. The tutoring and revision session significantly improved the students’ grades in the January exam.

Position


Job title: Internship
Employer: Green Εconomics Institute
Date of employment: September 2020-October 2020
Summary of role:

-Created and presented the PowerPoint presentation for the Climate Networking Conference run with the support of the Green European Foundation and attended by 200 people including policy makers, academics, campaigners, writers and scientists.
-Produced reports on the Climate Networking Conference speakers, including speakers from Greenpeace, Climate Action Network Europe, and MEPs. These were subsequently published in the post-conference journal.
-Edited ‘Landfill in Latvia. Towards a Circular Economy. A Scientific Monograph’, a book published by the Green Economics Institute.

Position


Job title: Internship
Employer: Embassy of the Republic of Cyprus in Beijing
Date of employment: July 2019- September 2019
Summary of role:

-Produced detailed reports on political affairs in East Asia, including the pro-democracy Hong Kong protests, that were sent to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Cyprus.
-Composed diplomatic correspondence letters (including note verbale) to various government representations, such as embassies and ministries of foreign affairs.
-Produced statistical reports measuring the frequency of different types of visas applied for, identifying the most popular application centers and the most popular months for applications.
-Updated information on the embassy website regarding bilateral meetings with China, volume of trade, and the number of visitors from each country to the other country.
-Assisted with embassy filing system and organizing visa records.

Position


Job title: Corporal
Employer: Cyprus National Guard
Date of employment: June 2016-September 2017
Summary of role:

-Acted as the line of communication between soldiers and the captain, and was responsible for the safety and readiness of my squad.
-Took part in weapons training (including assembling and disassembling), guard duty, weekly military emergency drills, and monthly target practice at live-fire shooting range.

Supporting Information:

Why do you want to teach overseas?:

My parents have been powerful role models; their influence has shaped my interests and values. My parents were EFL teachers in their youth, and their love of language learning and education has given me valuable insights into the challenges and rewards of teaching EFL. Seeing the fulfillment they derived from teaching has inspired me to pursue a similar career path. My mother’s studies in linguistics provided her with a deeper understanding of how language works. Her passion for the scientific study of language inspired me to explore the structure, sounds, and meanings of language, helpful skills for teaching students to learn and understand English and develop their language skills. I want to teach EFL (English as a Foreign Language) to share my enthusiasm for linguistics with my students. I look forward to designing and delivering lessons that help my students improve their grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, and their ability to communicate effectively in English, through speaking, writing, or listening. I find great fulfillment in seeing my students progress and succeed in their language-learning journey. The ability to speak and understand English is becoming increasingly important in today’s globalized world. Proficiency in English provides international career opportunities in a wide range of fields, such as business, science, and technology. I am excited to impart to my students the skills and confidence they need to succeed in their personal and professional lives. I want to teach in Korea specifically because K-dramas have piqued my interest in immersing myself in Korean culture and experiencing it firsthand. K-dramas have afforded me an understanding and appreciation for Korean culture, including traditional customs, social norms, and everyday life in South Korea. Living and teaching in Korea would allow me to immerse myself in the Korean language and gain a deeper understanding of the culture. Teaching EFL in Korea would combine my passion for language learning and teaching with my interest in Korean culture, making it a truly fulfilling and enriching experience.

Why are you a suitable candidate for teaching overseas?:

Encountering cultural differences can be both a challenging and enriching aspect of teaching overseas. On one hand, it can be difficult to navigate unfamiliar customs and traditions, and it can take time and effort to adapt to a new culture. On the other hand, encountering cultural differences can also be a wonderful opportunity to learn and grow, and it can broaden our perspective and understanding of the world. Adapting to any new country and culture can be challenging, however, some differences may make it easier or more difficult to adapt to different types of environments. New York’s cosmopolitanism makes foreigners stand out less and offers opportunities to interact with people from different cultures, which makes it easier to adapt. In contrast, Korea is a monocultural, homogenous country with fewer opportunities to interact with people from different cultural backgrounds, which can make it more challenging to adapt to the local culture and customs. Korea will be more difficult to communicate and get by without speaking Korean, another problem I did not have in New York. During my internship in Beijing, I developed skills that will help me adapt to Korean school life and culture. In particular, my experience in Beijing taught me the importance of being open-minded and respectful of other cultures, and of taking the time to learn and understand cultural differences rather than judging or imposing my cultural norms. My studies in International Relations at NYU have also given me a deeper understanding of the complexities and nuances of cultural differences. Through my coursework, I have learned about the various factors that shape cultural norms and practices, and I have gained a greater appreciation for the diversity of cultures around the world. As I adapt to Korean school life and culture, I plan to approach it with an open mind and a willingness to learn. Humor can be a universal language that helps to break down barriers and build connections between people from different cultures. Political and social issues may be seen differently from one culture to another, but can also provide common ground for discussion and understanding. However cultural differences still play a significant role in how humor and politics are perceived and received. What may be funny or acceptable in one culture may not be in another, and it is important to be aware of and respect these differences. Similarly, political and social issues can be sensitive and controversial, and it is important to approach them with respect and sensitivity to avoid causing offense or causing tension. I will seek out opportunities to learn about Korean customs and traditions, and I will strive to be respectful and understanding of cultural differences. This approach will help me adapt more smoothly to my new environment allowing me to have a more meaningful and enriching experience living and working in Korea.

Additional information:

My teaching philosophy centers on the belief that all students have the potential to succeed and that my role as a teacher is to help them reach their full potential through a combination of high expectations, personalized instruction, and a supportive and inclusive learning environment. The CELTA qualification taught me a student-centered teaching approach through interactive peer learning activities that foster critical thinking and problem-solving skills. However, it is common for Korean public schools to follow a traditional, teacher-centered approach to education where teachers lecture and students listen and take notes, with a focus on memorization and rote learning. That being said, I understand that every school and teacher is different, and there are variations in teaching approaches and philosophies within Korean public schools. I will strive to understand and respect the local educational system and culture, while also bringing my teaching philosophy and style to the classroom. As part of the CELTA course, I had to mark both written assignments and record speaking to assess the kinds of mistakes students made. This has given me practice in identifying which language skills (grammar, vocabulary, speaking, and listening) students are strong or weak at so that I can address their difficulties. I am interested in the difficulties Korean-speaking students face when learning English due to the significant differences between the two languages. Korean has a subject-object-verb sentence structure, while English follows a subject-verb-object order, which can lead to confusion and difficulties in understanding and producing correct sentences in English. In addition, English and Korean have no cognates thus Korean-speaking students cannot rely on their knowledge of Korean vocabulary to understand English words. Korean-speaking students may also face challenges with pronunciation, as English has many sounds that do not exist in Korean. For example, Korean does not have a “th” sound, so producing this sound can be difficult for Korean-speaking students. I will consider such challenges when designing lessons and giving feedback to my Korean-speaking students. I plan to draw on my experience as a mathematics tutor to bring a structured and organized approach to my lessons. My experience in the Cyprus National Guard has also taught me the importance of discipline and the value of clear communication, skills that are crucial for effective teaching. I plan to take advantage of professional development opportunities, such as workshops and training programs, to stay up-to-date on best practices in EFL teaching. I will conduct ongoing reflections on my teaching methods and seek out mentors and colleagues who can offer guidance and support as I continue to grow as a teacher. Overall, I am committed to continuously learning and improving as a teacher, in order to provide the best possible education for my students.