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applicant Photo

Application Status: Approved
Visa Status: Documents Ready

Teacher Details:


Name: Amir
Teacher ID: 7045
Nationality: British
Have you lived or worked overseas before?: Yes

Placement Preferences


Available Date: 19th September 2019
Travel Plans: I am travelling alone
Location Preferences: City

Education


Highest Qualification: BSc
Degree Subject: Business Information Technology
University / Institution: Leeds Beckett University
Grade: 2:1
Do you have a TEFL certificate: Yes
Details of TEFL certificate:

TEFL 150 hour Advanced

Were you educated in your native country?: Yes
Education comments:

whilst not a teaching role, responsible for training new and inexperienced staff in my current role. Also have been an active teacher online to Koreans through language exchange apps.

Work Experience

Position


Job title: Senior First Line Analyst
Employer: The Health Informatics Service (NHS – National Health Service)
Date of employment: 24/04/2018 – current
Summary of role:

Responsible for the training of new staff and supporting/encouraging service desk team with any complex troubleshooting, issues and queries. Responsible for providing customer support face to face when necessary and resolving issues that service desk team were unable to resolve first time due to issue complexity. Hold regular meetings with team leaders and management to discuss team performance and make suggestions for improvements. Promoted to senior role within 9 months (Jan 2019) due to performance levels, dedication to work and ability to assist and train colleagues. On average it takes 2 years or more to achieve this. Responsible for handling customer queries and providing support via phone, email, and online tickets with any IT related issues within Hospitals, Health Centres, Prisons, and for Health Workers in the Community. Involves troubleshooting and resolving issues remotely first time if possible or communicating with other teams if unable to do so. Often requires a high level of patience and requires strong communication skills.

Supporting Information:

Why do you want to teach overseas?:

I spent three months in South Korea in 2017. Whilst there I regularly attended language exchange meetups and met with natives to provide them with social situations and opportunities to test the English-speaking abilities with a native speaker and answer any queries that they had. One of my Korean friends is an English teacher in Ulsan and she teaches young children. Through constructive conversations with her I have gained encouragement in my desire to teach and have been able to gauge an idea of what a young classroom of students respond best to. I was also able to provide her with suggestions such as introducing more interactive tools into her lessons. Children can grow tired of repetitiveness, and the use of media and interactive learning tools every now and then can increase interest.
I would have no issues in transferring these teaching and learning skills into the workplace, and I believe that I would be a valuable asset to any school or academic organisation.

Why are you a suitable candidate for teaching overseas?:

During my current job role, I have had a significant amount of experience dealing with the training and teaching of new members of staff as well as the existing members of my team. This involved one-to-one training as well as providing knowledge and guidance to a wide group during team meetings. These meetings often resemble a classroom as there is the opportunity to provide feedback and staff can use the meetings to make notes and ask questions.
I relied on using my own time outside of work to plan what I would teach and how I would make the new member of staff learn the skills required efficiently and effectively. This regularly involved thinking of tasks that the member of staff can complete within short timeframes using pen and paper or a computer, providing and showing examples to the person, giving them opportunities to put what they have learnt to practise, monitoring their performance during tasks, encouraging them or assisting with guidance where necessary and providing feedback at the end on where they did well and how they can improve. New staff have to be prepared to work without training within a short amount of time, similarly to completing tasks during class and not running out of time. I have developed strong time management skills as a result of my experiences and I am not afraid to dedicate my own time to improve lessons and the methods that I use to train people.
I believe that I can use the skills that I have learnt and adapt them to a teaching environment. Some of these members of staff had little to no IT skills, which could be similar to an elementary school student having little to no knowledge of the English language. Despite this, I find the best way that each individual prefers to learn, decide on the best way to teach them, initially teach the basic skills and then over time introduce them to more complex information. This allows the member of staff to develop over time and not be overwhelmed and lose interest in what they are learning, which I think is very important for a young English student too. If they struggle to understand the language that they are learning and lose interest, they will be unable to learn it effectively or may not make the effort to learn.
I have also had a lot of personal experience teaching English. Since 2016 I have used language exchange applications such as HelloTalk and Tandem in order to learn the Korean language. Due to the amount of people I have communicated with I have been able to notice common patterns where Koreans tend to struggle or get confused over the differences between their language and mine, and they have expressed that their confusion was often down to misguidance when studying English in the classroom. Koreans regularly stated that they found they learnt more whilst speaking with native English speakers than they ever did in the classroom, which is disappointing and something that I would like to help change and improve. Learning in the classroom at a young age is the most effective way to develop due to the abilities a younger brain has to learn, process and remember new information.
Through regular contact over time I have been able to find the best way to explain the meanings of certain words and phrases to language partners and also explain why certain language is structured in the way that it is, whether this is down to grammar or tense. I found different ways to explain these points as people tend to learn language in different ways, and where someone was unable to understand the first time, I was always able to explain it in a different manner on the second attempt. This involved giving examples of real-world scenarios where the language may be applied, using readily available images or videos online to convey meaning and explain my points, or using comparisons between their language and mine. My experiences while assisting Koreans on these apps and my Korean friends give me an advantage in a Korean classroom, as I have received feedback on them as to what they disliked during their English classes and I would teach the curriculum in more interactive and interesting ways just as I have done in my current workplace.
I am always eager to help others, and would be more than happy to learn new skills during my placement in order to improve my teaching abilities. I have experience of working in a busy environment where there would often be many queries and questions coming from several members of staff at the same time, similarly to a classroom with several young students asking questions all at once, so I know how to be patient and control these situations. An example of a method I have used in the workplace would be when I ask colleagues what their queries are by having them write them down, then providing them with the answers all at once. It is possible that when one person has a query about something it could also be useful to provide the information to others who have just not thought to ask. This would be transferrable to a classroom. Children can be highly active but some can also be quite quiet and avoid asking questions that they have or approaching their teacher in front of their fellow students; providing feedback on one individual’s question to the entire class could provide these students with necessary information and give them encouragement for future lessons.
I have experience dealing with young children as I have many younger cousins and two nephews that I spend a lot of time with. This involves having a high level of patience; they understand things differently to adults, and often require simpler explanations. They frequently fail to understand things first time or primary explanations can lead to second questions, so I have had to be prepared to have a different way to explain the meanings of certain language that they have read or heard but failed to understand or became curious about. My experiences with my younger family members have prepared me for any difficult scenarios involving dealing with several young students in a classroom.

Additional information:

Back to results

applicant Photo

Application Status: Approved
Visa Status: Documents Ready

Teacher Details:


Name: Amir
Teacher ID: 7045
Nationality: British
Have you lived or worked overseas before?: Yes

Placement Preferences


Available Date: 19th September 2019
Travel Plans: I am travelling alone
Location Preferences: City

Education


Highest Qualification: BSc
Degree Subject: Business Information Technology
University / Institution: Leeds Beckett University
Grade: 2:1
Do you have a TEFL certificate: Yes
Details of TEFL certificate:

TEFL 150 hour Advanced

Were you educated in your native country?: Yes
Education comments:

whilst not a teaching role, responsible for training new and inexperienced staff in my current role. Also have been an active teacher online to Koreans through language exchange apps.

Work Experience

Position


Job title: Senior First Line Analyst
Employer: The Health Informatics Service (NHS – National Health Service)
Date of employment: 24/04/2018 – current
Summary of role:

Responsible for the training of new staff and supporting/encouraging service desk team with any complex troubleshooting, issues and queries. Responsible for providing customer support face to face when necessary and resolving issues that service desk team were unable to resolve first time due to issue complexity. Hold regular meetings with team leaders and management to discuss team performance and make suggestions for improvements. Promoted to senior role within 9 months (Jan 2019) due to performance levels, dedication to work and ability to assist and train colleagues. On average it takes 2 years or more to achieve this. Responsible for handling customer queries and providing support via phone, email, and online tickets with any IT related issues within Hospitals, Health Centres, Prisons, and for Health Workers in the Community. Involves troubleshooting and resolving issues remotely first time if possible or communicating with other teams if unable to do so. Often requires a high level of patience and requires strong communication skills.

Supporting Information:

Why do you want to teach overseas?:

I spent three months in South Korea in 2017. Whilst there I regularly attended language exchange meetups and met with natives to provide them with social situations and opportunities to test the English-speaking abilities with a native speaker and answer any queries that they had. One of my Korean friends is an English teacher in Ulsan and she teaches young children. Through constructive conversations with her I have gained encouragement in my desire to teach and have been able to gauge an idea of what a young classroom of students respond best to. I was also able to provide her with suggestions such as introducing more interactive tools into her lessons. Children can grow tired of repetitiveness, and the use of media and interactive learning tools every now and then can increase interest.
I would have no issues in transferring these teaching and learning skills into the workplace, and I believe that I would be a valuable asset to any school or academic organisation.

Why are you a suitable candidate for teaching overseas?:

During my current job role, I have had a significant amount of experience dealing with the training and teaching of new members of staff as well as the existing members of my team. This involved one-to-one training as well as providing knowledge and guidance to a wide group during team meetings. These meetings often resemble a classroom as there is the opportunity to provide feedback and staff can use the meetings to make notes and ask questions.
I relied on using my own time outside of work to plan what I would teach and how I would make the new member of staff learn the skills required efficiently and effectively. This regularly involved thinking of tasks that the member of staff can complete within short timeframes using pen and paper or a computer, providing and showing examples to the person, giving them opportunities to put what they have learnt to practise, monitoring their performance during tasks, encouraging them or assisting with guidance where necessary and providing feedback at the end on where they did well and how they can improve. New staff have to be prepared to work without training within a short amount of time, similarly to completing tasks during class and not running out of time. I have developed strong time management skills as a result of my experiences and I am not afraid to dedicate my own time to improve lessons and the methods that I use to train people.
I believe that I can use the skills that I have learnt and adapt them to a teaching environment. Some of these members of staff had little to no IT skills, which could be similar to an elementary school student having little to no knowledge of the English language. Despite this, I find the best way that each individual prefers to learn, decide on the best way to teach them, initially teach the basic skills and then over time introduce them to more complex information. This allows the member of staff to develop over time and not be overwhelmed and lose interest in what they are learning, which I think is very important for a young English student too. If they struggle to understand the language that they are learning and lose interest, they will be unable to learn it effectively or may not make the effort to learn.
I have also had a lot of personal experience teaching English. Since 2016 I have used language exchange applications such as HelloTalk and Tandem in order to learn the Korean language. Due to the amount of people I have communicated with I have been able to notice common patterns where Koreans tend to struggle or get confused over the differences between their language and mine, and they have expressed that their confusion was often down to misguidance when studying English in the classroom. Koreans regularly stated that they found they learnt more whilst speaking with native English speakers than they ever did in the classroom, which is disappointing and something that I would like to help change and improve. Learning in the classroom at a young age is the most effective way to develop due to the abilities a younger brain has to learn, process and remember new information.
Through regular contact over time I have been able to find the best way to explain the meanings of certain words and phrases to language partners and also explain why certain language is structured in the way that it is, whether this is down to grammar or tense. I found different ways to explain these points as people tend to learn language in different ways, and where someone was unable to understand the first time, I was always able to explain it in a different manner on the second attempt. This involved giving examples of real-world scenarios where the language may be applied, using readily available images or videos online to convey meaning and explain my points, or using comparisons between their language and mine. My experiences while assisting Koreans on these apps and my Korean friends give me an advantage in a Korean classroom, as I have received feedback on them as to what they disliked during their English classes and I would teach the curriculum in more interactive and interesting ways just as I have done in my current workplace.
I am always eager to help others, and would be more than happy to learn new skills during my placement in order to improve my teaching abilities. I have experience of working in a busy environment where there would often be many queries and questions coming from several members of staff at the same time, similarly to a classroom with several young students asking questions all at once, so I know how to be patient and control these situations. An example of a method I have used in the workplace would be when I ask colleagues what their queries are by having them write them down, then providing them with the answers all at once. It is possible that when one person has a query about something it could also be useful to provide the information to others who have just not thought to ask. This would be transferrable to a classroom. Children can be highly active but some can also be quite quiet and avoid asking questions that they have or approaching their teacher in front of their fellow students; providing feedback on one individual’s question to the entire class could provide these students with necessary information and give them encouragement for future lessons.
I have experience dealing with young children as I have many younger cousins and two nephews that I spend a lot of time with. This involves having a high level of patience; they understand things differently to adults, and often require simpler explanations. They frequently fail to understand things first time or primary explanations can lead to second questions, so I have had to be prepared to have a different way to explain the meanings of certain language that they have read or heard but failed to understand or became curious about. My experiences with my younger family members have prepared me for any difficult scenarios involving dealing with several young students in a classroom.

Additional information: